May 4, 2018 - Why You Can Stand on the Floor

biomechanics bone bone growth bone biomechanics osteoporosis

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Heidi-Lynn Ploeg

10:10 am
322 Fryklund Hall

Abstract

“Why You Can Stand on the Floor” is in large part due to the mechanics of your musculo-skeletal system, and is the primary research focus of the Bone and Joint Biomechanics (BJB) Laboratory. Osteoporosis (OP) is a debilitating disease of the musculo-skeletal system and a major health concern in an aging population. Currently, OP affects 10 million Americans, that is 1 in 2 elderly women and 1 in 4 elderly men. According to the Administration on Aging: “People 65+ represented 12.4% of the population in the year 2000 but are expected to grow to be 20% of the population by 2030.” The projected costs of OP are therefore $45 billion by 2025 an increase of $10 billion from 2004. Contributing factors to OP are loss of skeletal integrity, inactivity and the development of sarcopenia in the aged. Conversely, exercise has been shown to reduce both sarcopenia and retard bone loss in the aged. In animal models, exercise has been shown to increase skeletal integrity by 10 to 14% for the same mineral density. Solving the mysteries of how human tissue adapts to mechanical stimuli with increased strength will permit new and improved innovations in bone and joint health, disease prevention and treatment. The research goal of the BJB Lab is to develop accurate physical and virtual models of the human musculo-skeletal system for the planning and assessment of orthopaedic and rehabilitative procedures for:

  • Disease prevention
  • Designing biomedical devices
  • Planning surgical intervention
  • Enhancing computer aided surgery

Bio

Heidi-Lynn Ploeg is an Associate Professor in Mechanical Engineering, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Including 10 years at Zimmer, she has 30 years of experience in research and analysis of orthopaedic devices. Over the last 15 years, 47 graduate students have graduated from her lab. Her research interests include studying the nature of bone, bone growth and joint biomechanics.

Lecture archive

Apr 20, 2018 - The scaling up of biological strength: bone mechanics and function during growth and aging

bone mechanics biomechanics bone growth computational cell dynamics tissue biomechanics

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Dr. Mariana Kersh

10:10 am
322 Fryklund Hall

Abstract

Over a lifespan of approximately 70 years, bone withstands millions of loading cycles from muscle forces with incredible resilience to fatigue. However, the mechanisms driving bone formation, organization, and strength are yet to be fully resolved. What is known is (1) the mechanical cues for bone development in mammals are a result of the dynamic muscle and joint forces experienced during locomotion, and less influenced by static gravitational forces and (2) the adaptation of bone to accommodate increased external forces occurs in a specific manner. That is – it doesn’t just get bigger - it has a specific preferential distribution of material in order to maintain efficient mechanical competency.

In this talk, I will present our recent efforts to understand the three-dimensional mechanics of bone during growth and aging. First, using a murine model of growth, we investigated the determinants of spatially heterogeneous strain within the tibia using longitudinal imaging and multi-scale computational models. We also investigated these allometric relationships in equine bone to determine if these hold true for larger animals. Next, I will present a computational assessment of bone strain energy in older human bone samples. Here we aim to identify whether increased strain energy is characterized by morphological features and associated with specific phases of cellular activity during bone remodeling. We present evidence to suggest that an uncoupling in osteoclast to osteoblast activity exists that may be related to strain-mediated cell dynamics.

Bio

Mariana Kersh is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering at The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Director of the Tissue Biomechanics Laboratory. She holds degrees in English, Mechanical Engineering and Material Science. Her research focus is on the structure-mechanical function of orthopedic tissues during development as well as the progression of musculoskeletal diseases.

Lecture archive

Apr 13, 2018 - Advancements in Motorcycle Rider Comfort

polaris CFD user experience motor sports power sports

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10:10 am
322 Fryklund Hall

Abstract

The past several years have seen a major increase in rider comfort expectations in the power sports industry. From wind protection, to excessive engine heat, riders are demanding more out of their vehicles. This talk will go over some of the tools that are used to determine rider comfort levels and design guidelines in developing vehicles. Current analysis methods and a testing tools will be presented. The product development cycle will also be discussed.

Bio

Kent Underland is a Senior CAE Engineer at Polaris Industries. He received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Minnesota in 2017. At Polaris, he is the leading expert in motorcycle rider aero and thermal comfort utilizing CFD and other analysis tools. He has also developed testing methods for rider leg temperatures and wind buffeting off of windshields. He is a father of one with another on the way and enjoys rec sports like baskeball, softball, and volleyball.